Tag Archives: NJ Opra

My OPRA Request Was Denied. Now What?

OPRA requires public agencies to respond within 7 business days of your request. (Tip: Begin counting the first business day after you filed the request).  A public agency must respond within 7 business days and either: 1) Produce responsive records; 2) Tell you that access is being denied and reason for the denial; or 3) Ask for an extension of time to respond.

But what do you do if the government fails to respond (a deemed denial) or denies access to a record that you know is not exempt?

The best course of action is to immediately speak to an attorney, who can work with you to gain access to the records.   This frequently requires a lawsuit filed in Superior Court.  The most important thing to remember is that your action must be filed within the statute of limitations, which is 45 days. The process for filing a lawsuit in Superior Court is as follows:

  1. A Verified Complaint and Order to Show Cause is filed.  Each county has a designated “OPRA Judge” who will hear the matter.
  2. The OPRA Judge will review and sign the Order to Show Cause, which sets a briefing schedule and a hearing date.
  3. The pleadings are then served upon the public agency and custodian.
  4. Often, a public agency may work with your attorney to settle the case by producing records and paying the attorneys’ fees.
  5. If the parties are unable to settle, the agency will file an answer and opposition to your lawsuit.
  6. Your attorney then has an opportunity to file a reply brief
  7. A hearing is held, wherein the judge will hear arguments from both sides. For simple cases, the Judge will usually enter a ruling that day. More complex cases may require a little more time for an opinion to issue. In certain circumstances, the court may allow for discovery (interrogatories, depositions) to occur.
  8. If you win, the Judge will order the agency to produce records to you and your attorney will file a fee application asking the Court to order the agency to pay your counsel fees and costs of suit.  (Many attorneys, like Pashman Stein Walder Hayden, represent requestors on a contingency basis which means that if you lose, you will not owe any counsel fees).

Again, the most important thing to remember is that there is a very short timeline for filing the initial Verified Complaint – 45 days from the date your request was denied (or, if the agency fails to respond, the date the response was due).

For more information about this blog post or any other OPRA question, please contact cgriffin@pashmanstein.com.

 

 

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Sunshine Week: Rich Rivera

Today’s Sunshine Week profile features Rich Rivera, a police practices expert who uses OPRA to monitor police misconduct and the use of force by police officers on citizens.  Mr. Rivera is the Chairman of the Latino Leadership Alliance of New Jersey’s Civil Rights Protection Project, which addresses the community’s needs relating to police services and police interactions. He is a former Board Member of the ACLU of New Jersey, where he co-authored the report “The Crisis Inside Police Internal Affairs.”  Pashman Stein has litigated several cases on Mr. Rivera’s behalf.

Interview with Rich Rivera:

  1. When and how did you initially become interested in the open government movement?

In the late 1990s, when I began researching policing in New Jersey.

  1. What types of government records or open government issues interest you most?

Anything relating to policing, as well as government efficiency and draconian government policies.  All of my requests are made to work towards reform and government transparency.

  1. How many OPRA requests do you file a year? How many times would you estimate the public agency violates OPRA? Of those, how many do you actually litigate?

I file over 100 requests each year. Custodians violate OPRA in about half of my requests, but I litigate about five instances a year. So overwhelmingly, the violations go unchecked.  I gave up on GRC complaints more than 5 years ago and file exclusively in Superior Court now, where you get results faster.

  1. If you could persuade the Legislature to amend OPRA, what would be your top suggestions?

I would ask the legislature to give some teeth to upholding public records access and to develop penalties for the unlawful destruction of public records.  As it stands, there are some entities that purge records after public access requests and that’s simply a crime.  But, an OPRA requester has no real recourse when that occurs.

For more information about this blog post or any other OPRA question, please contact cgriffin@pashmanstein.com.

Sunshine Week: Pat Gilleran

Today’s Sunshine Week profile focuses on Pat Gilleran, a client for whom Pashman Stein has litigated many OPRA matters.  Pat is an open government and animal rights activist.  Pat’s litigation has been instrumental in forcing non-profit business improvement districts to comply with OPRA’s provisions.  Presently, Pashman Stein is defending an appeal on Pat’s behalf relating to video footage from a surveillance camera outside the Bloomfield Municipal Building. While the trial court ruled in Pat’s favor and held that the footage was subject to OPRA, Bloomfield has refused to release the footage.  A decision from the Appellate Division is expected soon.

Interview with Pat Gilleran:

  1. When and how did you initially become interested in the open government movement?

I attended a class that the legendary Martin O’Shea (a plaintiff in numerous landmark OPRA cases) gave in Bloomfield in 2008 (I think). I also found NJFOG and attended a seminar in 2013.

  1. What types of government records or open government issues interest you most?

Meeting minutes especially closed session meetings; Animal rights issues at Municipal Shelters;  501(c)3 organizations that are created and controlled by municipalities and ensuring that they comply with OPRA and OPMA; Eminent domain; Local (including county) finances; ELEC reports that can then be compared with contract awards; Records of contamination and cleanups.

  1. How many OPRA requests do you file a year? How many times would you estimate the public agency violates OPRA? Of those, how many do you actually litigate?

I filed my first OPRA request in 2010 – it was for Bloomfield Town Council meeting minutes.  The response was disheartening in that I was told that meeting minutes would not be produced, but that video was available to the tune of $20 per meeting.

I filed 53 OPRA requests in 2012 (it was reported in the local paper) and didn’t have an attorney so zero were litigated. I’d say that about 20% of the responses violated OPRA in that they were incomplete or that they denied that records were available. In 2013, the number of requests that I filed went up to 82 (I know because someone OPRA requested all of my OPRA requests).  I still didn’t have an attorney so zero were litigated, but at least 20% of the responses violated OPRA.

2014 was a banner year for me. My strategy changed. I was connected with my attorney CJ Griffin and figured out that in order for the public agencies to start complying with OPRA, there had to be some court sanction of their wrongful denials.  I filed over 100 requests and 9 were litigated, all of which were victories for me because the public agencies had so clearly violated OPRA.  One of those cases relating to security camera at the Bloomfield Municipal Building is on appeal.

For 2015, I have filed about 50 requests so far this year. At least 50% of the responses (or lack thereof) have violated OPRA.

  1. If you could persuade the Legislature to amend OPRA, what would be your top suggestions?

A more lenient standard for personal penalties for Municipal Clerks that willfully violate OPRA and withhold documents. Support of the Open Public Meetings Act by mandating attorney fees for those who file OPMA violations. Penalties for excessive and unwarranted extensions.

For more information about this blog post or any other OPRA question, please contact cgriffin@pashmanstein.com.

Pashman Stein Secures OPRA Win in Police Shooting Case

Recently, Pashman Stein secured a victory in the case North Jersey Media Group v. Township of Lyndhurst, et al.  Below are links to media covering this important decision, in which the Hon. Peter E. Doyne, A.J.S.C., ruled that the Defendant public agencies violated OPRA and compelled the Defendants to produce records relating to the police shooting of a man in Lyndhurst in September 2014.

http://www.nj.com/bergen/index.ssf/2015/01/judge_orders_release_of_records_in_fatal_bergen_co.html

http://www.northjersey.com/opinion/opinion-editorials/access-to-public-records-1.1194621 

http://www.northjersey.com/news/judge-rules-police-must-avoid-delays-in-public-records-requests-1.1192002